The Critique Circle Blog

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Apr
18
2014

Five Things You Should do Now to Improve Your Writing -- by Michael Henderson

Mark Twain said to replace "very" with "damn." When your editor deletes "damn," then your writing will be as it should be.

Apr
13
2014

A Passport to Write -- by Kristen Hendricks

Like so many individuals before me, persons with active imaginations and decent grades in high school English, I set out to try this thing called writing.

Apr
8
2014

Every Writer's Fortune -- by Jon Goff

We each possess a fortune, though most are ignorant of it. We squander our wealth on things that have little or no value. Businesses calculate expenditures on different things based on the return on investment (ROI). A prosperous business considers every purchase and weighs it against the cost to benefit ratio of what it brings to the business. Calculating the ROI helps them to determine where to spend, and how much they should invest in any given purchase. Ideally, they want as high a return on their investment as possible, which leads me to your fortune.

Apr
3
2014

Character Development in Crime Novels -- by David Kilner

An enduring debate among writers, teachers and readers of crime fiction is how much character development should a detective undergo, not only within one novel but from one novel to the next?

Some are adamant that no character development is allowed. The detective is seen as a ‘catalyst hero’ who affects others but is unaffected by them or by their experiences, no matter how fraught. Traditional examples would be Sherlock Holmes, Philip Marlowe and Miss Marple while more recent examples include Detective Colombo and Phryne Fisher.

Mar
29
2014

The importance of marketing -- by Betty Dolphin

Due to the internet opening up avenues such as smashwords, amazon, createspace, etc., the large trade publishers offer less advances and require the author to engage in the marketing aspects more aggressively. This worries many writers, causes others to slack off, and can easily crush spirits. As a writer who has monitored this for many years, I offer a response to a troublesome article recently released.

Mar
24
2014

Using meditation to boost your creativity -- by Sam Wright

If you look at job advertisements closely, you will notice that the most used word in them is creativity. Some people are naturally creative ? but what if you?re not? Is there anything that can help you boost your brain into finding its creative self?

Mar
19
2014

Writing Goals -- by Karla Brandenburg

The recent poll on the home page caught my attention, not just because it was thought provoking, but because my answer might change, depending on where I?m at in the writing process.

Mar
14
2014

Write Right Online Into Fictional Series -- by Harley Garrett

To create, develop and write expanses of fiction in e-publishing, the writing of a series is a viable option. Where to consider publishing, the writing of series is a viable option. Where to consider serialization treatment of either a complete draft or story outline is dependent on particular components.

Mar
9
2014

Why it's essential to structure your novel -- by Bridget Mcnulty

While it is not always necessary to plot your novel in detail ahead of time, you do need to structure your novel. This helps to ensure that you develop all of the elements including plot, setting, character and theme.

Mar
8
2014

CC Restructured! Things to know -- by Jon Bjarnason

So finally after years and years of waiting, the new CC site is finally here. If you missed my earlier blog and haven't played around with the beta site yet you might be in for a bit of a shock.

In this short blog I will go over some of the main changes in a FAQ format. Send more questions my way in the comments section and I'll do my best to answer them.

Mar
4
2014

The Hubris of Writing -- by Karla Brandenburg

As authors, there is always a moment of ?who do I think I am?? when writing a book. Of ?this story sucks, no one will want to read it.? And yet we put our hearts and our souls into the people and places we create on the page. Let me send this message loud and clear. If you are taking the time to write it, if you are taking the steps to hone your craft, the only way you will succeed, in the end, is by believing in yourself. Instead of telling yourself you have no business trying to be an author, try telling yourself you have every right to be an author.

Feb
25
2014

Don't Let Things Get Ugly: Etiquette for Authors -- by Mysti Parker

If you're an author, chances are that at some point you'll make a mistake somewhere along the marketing path. Indie or small press authors have to work even harder than traditionally published authors to keep their careers on the right path. Navigating the waters of public scrutiny is rather like a neverending job interview. You have to maintain a positive image and hold on to your umbrella of integrity, even when the rough winds of criticism threaten to blow it to Timbuktu.

Here are a few guidelines that may help you when it comes to author etiquette:

Feb
18
2014

CC is changing... a lot -- by Jon Bjarnason

In my two previous blogs, with the catchy titles "The changing face of CC - basic layout" and "The changing face of CC - Story view" I discussed with you some of the things that I wanted to change about the look and feel of our beloved Critique Circle website.

Today I can announce with great gusto that I've completed some of the work in bringing the site up to the 20th century (I'll look into the 21st century next year) and I would very much like to invite you to take a look at the results, which are available in a special web address just for the occasion:

Feb
3
2014

Out of the comfort zone -- by Sigrun Erna Geirsdottir

How often have you heard that you should write often and try your hand at different things? Many times, I'm guessing, more often than you can count. And you know what? It's true.

Jan
26
2014

Permission to Fail -- by Jon Goff

Success is a funny thing, we all want it, but to get it we have to fail. From our failures, we learn the lessons that lead to success. We learn what works and what doesn't and that refining process takes us toward the success we all want.

Jan
18
2014

Working with Established Characters. -- by Andrew Mcqueen

Alrighty, boys and girls! Are you looking to put in your writing into comic books? If you are, here's a little heads up: When you're writing for comics and graphic novels, you'll be appointed with established characters at one point or another. Clearly, anybody will tell you about a comic book writer who's worked on your favorites. *Comic book master Peter David states that when working with characters like Zatanna or the X-Men, you're being handed a certain degree of reader investment and it's easier to sustain and build an audience with established characters than ones made from scratch.

Jan
12
2014

The changing face of CC - Story view -- by Jon Bjarnason

In my last blog I talked about some changes I want to make this year to the basic layout on CC. Check it out if you haven't already.

Today I am going to be talking about the heart of CC: The story view and the crit process. I personally think that the process of critting stories right now is pretty darn good, and I must be careful not to inadvertently make it worse while trying to make it better. Therefore I'm going into this with a little sense of apprehension.

Jan
8
2014

The changing face of CC - Basic Layout -- by Jon Bjarnason

There has been some discussion lately about how dated CC has become since the look-and-feel of the site hasn't much in the last ten years or so. I will make it my new-years resolution to slap on a new coat of paint and make some visual adjustments.

This is the first of my blogs on the matter where I attempt to solicit input from you guys to help me understand what's truly important to you.

Dec
27
2013

Developing Your Writing Plan for 2014 -- by Tony Dingwell

I have been auditor of financial statements and organizational performance for over 30 years and I can say that the people and organisations who make it, plan for success then follow their plans. I have seen many that fail and almost all either had no plans or had an unworkable plan.
As this year comes to a close, I thought I would share with you a simple strategy for developing a plan for success in 2014.

Nov
14
2013

Adding Extra Digital Content to Your Book: That is The Question -- by Lina Conlin

When I finished my book, I remember thinking about writing a sequel, changing the ending, or maybe even adding another chapter. I had worked so hard, and it still felt like I didn't want it to be over.

After much thinking I came up with the perfect solution. It was so obvious, I was surprised I hadn't thought about it before. All I had to do was add digital content.

Nov
1
2013

Creativity Tips - Lateral Thinking -- by Emilie Poissenot

Lateral thinking is the secret to "thinking outside the box." Wanna know how it works and how to do it on demand?

Oct
20
2013

The first ten years -- by Jon Bjarnason

Critique Circle celebrates its ten year anniversary on Oct 21st! Congratulations, everyone!

In this blog I'm going to rant on a bit about this and that which comes to mind at this juncture. If you don't want to read the blog, at least scroll down a few paragraphs and check out the birthday gifts we've got for you guys.

Oct
14
2013

Lessons Learned From My First Year of Indie-Publishing -- by Kelly Walker

I don't consider myself an expert. There are lots of people who know lots more than I do both about the craft of writing ( and about where to put commas and question marks ) and about publishing. But a year into my Indie journey, I do consider myself experienced.

Oct
5
2013

Creativity Tips - Find Your Triggers -- by Emilie Poissenot

This article explores the creation and use of what I call "creative triggers", stimuli that shoot words onto the page.

Sep
30
2013

Are You Tight Enough? -- by Alex Sheridan

Alex Sheridan

Author of Dance of Spies, Finding Round, Treasure Life and Freedom Jungle
Freeing the world with words

Sep
23
2013

Do you get lost in your novel draft? Here's a helpful tool. -- by Carol Ervin

I love Microsoft's OneNote Notebooks for drafting a novel. Its design and tools help me organize the millions of elements, ideas, and words floating in the mix of a new story.

Sep
16
2013

Writing what you know is not always what you think -- by Marcia Kuma

Who hasn't heard that old adage, "write what you know"? That's how to get realism in your story, and if your story doesn't feel real, nobody's going to want to read it, goes the thought. Oh poor writers, sitting there with that sinking feeling, because you're an accountant or a phys ed teacher and you want to write hard science fiction or steampunk, but the adage says you can't.

Sep
9
2013

When Are Cliches Safe To Use? -- by Angela Ackerman

We hear tons of advice saying that clich?s should be avoided, so I thought I'd stroll over to the other side of the literary fence and look at when it's actually okay to use them.

Sep
2
2013

Showing Emotion in Dialogue-Heavy Scenes -- by Angela Ackerman

Very few things pull people in like conversation. After all, when someone speaks, they are making themselves vulnerable to others. How? Because words are steeped in thoughts, beliefs and emotions. They have meaning. Power.

Aug
28
2013

5 Important Things A Writer Can Do To Evolve -- by Angela Ackerman

A difficult time for me was the moment I decided to pursue publication as opposed to writing for myself and wondering if I was talented enough to do it. It meant peeling off the rose colored glasses and admitting to my flaws. To become a professional writer, I had to come to terms with how much I didn?t know. Like many others, I knew zilch about the publishing industry, how to approach agents and editors, and most importantly, how to hone my writing to get it where it needed to be.

Aug
23
2013

Want High Stakes? AMP UP THE STRESS! -- by Angela Ackerman

In the real world, we avoid stress whenever possible but in writing, the opposite is true. Why? Because in the land of the Three Act Structure (TAS), STRESS = CONFLICT.

Aug
18
2013

Character, Conflict, Crucible, Complicate, Crisis, Conclusion -- by Megan Carney

Recently, I attended ThrillerFest in New York. It was a fabulous experience. The experience of pitching to agents is a blog post all on its own. But when I was asked to write about my trip, I wanted to share the most practical advice I received. That advice came from a presentation Steve Berry gave entitled "The 6 C's of Story Structure." It was the most succinct and clear description I've heard of story structure anywhere. Like something worthy of being animated by RSA Animate. I don't quite have their talent, but I did put together a little graphic that illustrates everything I'm about to say.

Aug
13
2013

Evaluating Critique Feedback -- by Angela Ackerman

So, you've mastered your anxiety and have placed your manuscript into the crittery waters of a new critique group. You wait, compulsively checking your inbox for the feedback to roll in. You're excited, but a little scared, too. Will they laugh-out-loud where they're supposed to, weep at the sheer brilliance of a certain plot twist, get sucked in by your vivid description?

Ping. In comes a critique. Ping. Another, and another.

Aug
7
2013

The Pros and Cons of Writing Groups -- by Lily Iona Mackenzie

Being part of an on-line writing group for several years has provided many benefits. But with the positives come a few negatives.

Aug
3
2013

Common Writing Snafus: Over-Expressed Emotions -- by Angela Ackerman

Emotions can be the most difficult to convey (this is why Becca and I built the Emotion Thesaurus!) Not only do we need to express without telling, we have to show the emotion in a fresh way, make sure it feels genuine and have it match the character's expressive range. Add that to highlighting action and minimizing internal sensations and thoughts? It's a lot to juggle.

Jul
28
2013

Where's Your Voice? -- by Alex Sheridan

"Voice? What the heck is that about?" I mumbled, hunched over another how-to manual, a couple months into scaling the writing craft mountain. Its snowcapped peak sparkled down at me, egging me on from the bunny slopes. And hey, I think I can see some money up there too. I made a pot of coffee and cracked open another book.

Jul
18
2013

Emotion-Charged Settings -- by Angela Ackerman

Sometimes when we write, we become so obsessed with the characters and events unfolding, we forget to pay attention to the Setting. Conflict and Action are important, don?t get me wrong, but Setting is no wallflower. Used correctly, it becomes a powerful amplifier for emotion.

Jul
8
2013

My Influences as a Writer. -- by Andrew Mcqueen

When I chose literature for a career, I thought of my influences and comic book writer Kurt Busiek came to mind. Kurt Busiek is one of the reason I chose my career path as a writer.

Jul
5
2013

Publishing terrifies me! -- by Donna Comeaux

I posed this question the other day to my critique group at Critique Circle.com: "As incentive to complete a novel or put yourself on a tighter schedule, have you ever heard of someone posting a partial novel on their blog or webpage? I can see someone doing that on a webpage, but a blog? Your thoughts, please."

Jul
2
2013

Stuck in the Editing Process? -- by Beth Rhodes

Yesterday, I finished up and polished the short-short story I've been tweaking on and off for a few years now. It's amazing. I'd compare this feeling to what I had when I finally finished a rough novel draft. I can now breathe a sigh of relief and move on to the next step, as well as work on edits to my novel.

There are a few things I learned about the editing process along the way:

Jun
29
2013

Leverage My World -- by C. Stuart Hardwick

Language evolves, and English as we know it would not exist without neologisms and other mechanisms of change, but more to the point, leverage is, in fact, a perfectly acceptable transitive verb...

Jun
23
2013

Writing Satire is Addictive. Please... send... help -- by Lindy Moone

In our "Reuse, Recycle, Reblog" series, author Lindy Moone joins spoof news site "NewsBiscuit", and lives to tell the tale.

Jun
20
2013

Bringing My Book to a Local Small Press Book Fair -- by David Anderson

No, I didn't make back my ten dollar fee with those three sales.

Sound grim? Actually the opposite.

Jun
12
2013

What Makes a Good Story Opening? -- by Carol Ervin

Writers everywhere want to know. What makes a great opening?

Jun
3
2013

Finding the Motivation- My CC Experience -- by C. Michele Shriver

It was five months after I joined when sign-ups for National Novel Writing Month were going strong. At this stage of my life, I was very much a "someday" novelist, meaning "Someday, I'll write a novel." Thanks to CC, my someday came that November.

May
27
2013

Uncut Diamonds -- by Jessica Kaye

In the beginning, this was the beginning:

"Once there was a girl named Rapunzel who lived with her great aunt."

I know, I know; you're not sure whether to cringe or snore. Not a great way to start a novel. That's the first sentence from one of the early versions of my book, ?Rapunzel.? Clearly, I needed help. How could I magically transform this blah sentence into an effective hook?

May
21
2013

Thank You, Critique Circle! -- by Mimiwriter

I joined CC in 2005 as I began my journey with my first contemporary romance, Time Changes Everything. Back then,I just wrote as a hobby and for the fun of it. I never thought I'd actually take it to the next level. But, CC did that for me. I got better, I grew, I wrote, I critiqued, I learned and the rest is history!

May
13
2013

CC and Me -- by Arlene Webb

June, 2006 was a fantastic month. That's when someone on Critters (another writer site) told me, Arlene Webb, about CC. Within a year, I had a star beside my name, a buddy list, and private queues for a series I?d been working on since 2004.

For me, CC isn't just about honing the craft of writing, although I bear testament to how fantastic the site is with thousands of crits given and received. I've made friends that know me better than anyone else and those friends are still teaching me how to write.

May
8
2013

Is your book still in your head? -- by Tobias D. Robison -- by Tobias D. Robison

When you're wondering how good your writing is, the best way to find out is to get comments from at least five hundred readers. A tiny group of readers makes a poor statistical sample. Critiquers at Critique Circle present a better alternative. They will offer an extraordinary variety of insights. Take a look at almost any chapter posted here, and marvel at how the critiques vary.

Critique Circle has had a profound affect on my writing. I discovered, both from critiques on my own writing, and from critiquing others, how dangerous it is for anyone to see their writing from their own point of view.

Other people will read your books. That's the goal, right? It is not very important that they bring their own preconceptions, biases, misunderstandings and misapprehensions to your writing. It is much more important if your story is so clear to you, the author, that you failed to narrate it. People will fill in the missing gaps, and in the process, they will become angry, confused, and bored.

Apr
29
2013

Writing Isn't Just for Writers -- by M. J. Ascot

I wish I'd taken up creative writing decades ago, taken it seriously, I mean, really gotten into the craft. It's not because I dream of fame and fortune, or the past that might have been. Writing, as a profession, is much like sport. A few make a fortune, but most folk pay to play.

However, we don't need to be pro athletes to benefit from sport. And we don't need to aspire to publication to benefit from writing.

To be successful in almost any field of endeavor, we need the ability to deliver our message, get our point across, share our passions. We need to communicate.

And what is creative writing in a forum like this, if not communication? We seek, not merely to connect, but to influence, to inspire, to draw others into a world of our making.

Apr
22
2013

An Eighty Percent Solution -- by Tom Gondolfi

I use to attend and even host any number of F2F critique groups over my thirty plus years of writing but often felt it was a waste of time. My stories had been read and enjoyed by complete strangers so I felt the plot and character creation was solid. What I needed was help improving my craft. Because of this I tended toward destructive critique groups ? those who would point out the flaws in my work rather than pat me on the head for having written anything at all.

What I found most painful with these groups was submitting a work of science fiction to writers where the vast percentage had never read scifi nor cared. Additionally the politics of how often or how much material one could ?burden other authors with? became a constant sore spot for me.

Apr
18
2013

Author Spotlight: PATIENCE - AND CRITIQUE CIRCLE - PAY OFF -- by Diana Rubino


My 'overnight success' took 18 years. I wrote my first novel at age 23, after a dose of reality in the brokerage business. This was the early '80s, when executive-level women were virtually nonexistent in the world of finance. My first novel, largely autobiographical, as most first novels are, featured my heroine who made it to the top of a brokerage firm. It was continually rejected on the grounds that I had an axe to grind?and of course I did.

Apr
9
2013

Critique Circle: My "Single Parent" Support Group -- by Lindy Moone

All writers—married or single—know that writing takes time and patience. It takes solitude, too: a room of its own. I sometimes feel like an overwhelmed single parent, raising little story monsters. I've learned that I needn't do it all alone, but who'd invite a single mom with three wild "kids" into their home? Who'd want to read my early drafts? No one, except other single parents. Other writers.

Mar
25
2013

Studying, Socializing, and Sentence Fragments: The Ultimate Balancing Act -- by Allyson Gottlieb

Except for a very rare, elite few, all writers have another job: the one that pays the bills. So working on your next bestseller (a full-time job in and of itself) has to be squeezed between other obligations of life. It's a bit like walking a tightrope sometimes, trying to fit it all in - walking a tightrope backwards, while blindfolded, carrying a massive bowl of fruit (on your head).

Mar
18
2013

Critique Circle: The Birthplace of my Novels -- by Rachelle Ayala

Critique Circle is the birthplace of my first three novels, all published within one year. I can honestly say that without the wonderful writers at Critique Circle, I would still be sitting at my engineering job churning code and going over build results and bug counts.

I was introduced to Critique Circle by Victorine Lieske. It was Feb 2011 and I had a draft of Michal's Window. My daughter had read it. I had also sent chapters to a friend who said it was good. But in reality, it stunk. I had no clue what I should do next. Write query letters? Find an editor? All seemed so daunting and unapproachable.

That's when I sent a note to Victorine on kindleboards. I asked her how she prepared her blockbuster novel for publication. She pointed me to Critique Circle and changed my life.

Mar
12
2013

Critique Circle: Seven years and counting -- by Lucie Ulrich

I'll admit that my skin was paper thin when I first signed on, and it took some doing to realize that most comments given were for my own good, and for the good of my writing. My biggest struggle was figuring out what advice worked and what didn't. I came to writing without any training and found the plethora of advice overwhelming, but eventually learned to trust my instincts and my heart.

Through it all, I found some wonderful critique partners I've come to trust and respect. Do I take all their suggestions to heart? No. Do I stop and give them thought before dismissing them? Absolutely.

Mar
8
2013

The Proof of the Pudding... Is in the Reading -- by Lindy Moone

We writers — ha ha — we're so messy. We play with words like toddlers with pudding — pudding we assemble ourselves.

We have so many ingredients to choose from, and they're all so yummy; it's hard to know what to put in — or leave out of — the recipe. We want to be original. We need to be novel. Especially when we write genre stories, which can seem like "lite pudding" — light on substance, on meaning, on meat. Sometimes our pudding gets bad press (all plot, no purpose). Sometimes thats not fair; plenty of genre stories are loaded with meat. But sometimes its "just desserts."

Mar
5
2013

Rejection Letters, Critique Circle, Getting Published and Something Special -- by Keith Rommel

Alister Kunkle believes death is in love with him. A simple smile from friend or stranger is all it takes to encourage death to kill.
With his family deceased and a path of destruction behind him, Alister sits inside a mental institution, sworn to silence and separated from the rest of the world, haunted by his inability to escape death's preferential treatment.
But when a beautiful psychologist arrives at the institution and starts offering him care, Alister braces himself for more killings. When none follow, he tries to figure out whether he truly is insane or if death has finally come to him in the form of a woman. Alister Kunkle believes death is in love with him. A simple smile from friend or stranger is all it takes to encourage death to kill.

Mar
2
2013

Comic Book 101: Special Edition! -- by Andrew Mcqueen

I know that this group is unfamiliar with writing for comic books and graphic novels. So I'm bringing forth more knowledge on the craft. First, we'll begin with formats.

Full Script-This gives the artist and editor the entire story descriptions of scenes, dialogue, sound effects. Character dialogue is written in all caps. Action descriptions of characters and setting are described in each panel up to several paragraphs or less. Plus, each page should start fresh on another piece of paper with a notion of how many panels. Another thing to take heed are the modifiers.

Feb
26
2013

Why CC beats any day at Writing School -- by Shane Jeffery

I stumbled onto Critique Circle in 2011 with a handful of short stories I couldn't even convince my friends to read, and within a couple of weeks I had six solid critiques on the first piece I submitted. The people critiquing, were, in most aspects, just like you - the aspiring writer - looking to improve and lift one's abilities in writing. They don't have a University curriculum to appease. They don't have a rule book with guidelines that are comprised from hidden agendas. They are, in essence, great appreciators of storytelling and have an open mind when it comes to personal artistry.

Feb
22
2013

Is Your As Bad? -- by Alex Sheridan

Some learning moments are quiet, useful little nuggets, but some come as loud epiphanies, forever changing the flow of a writer's words.

My AS moment came like a bolt of lightening. When my eyes opened to this small but potentially hazardous word, it was a great big 'Why didn't I see that before?'

I'm sharing this slice of my learning curve pain on the chance a fellow writer or two might need the nugget added to their pile. So they can have their stupid AS moment, too.

Feb
18
2013

Opening Doors to the Children's Publishing World: My Experience at SCBWI New York, 2013 -- by David Anderson

In all, I left feeling that the Writer's Roundtables were worth the money. I met other writers, got an inside look at what editors and agents are thinking, and got a toenail in the door with two editors at major publishing houses, along with their professional feedback on something I had written. I didn't leave with any illusions that the editors were going to welcome everyone's manuscripts. They promised to review our submissions, but that could mean a lot of things, including that they might read the opening line and delete the email. We were, however, assured by these editors that they had acquired the manuscripts of some conference attendees in the past.

Feb
11
2013

Going Public -- by Carol Ervin

I had a slow and rocky start on CritiqueCircle. I'd read books about writing fiction, but wasn't applying what I'd learned. I had situations and character problems in mind, but not much of a story. Critiquers here were kind, with comments like "I don't know where this is going." I thought I was thick-skinned, but I was easily discouraged. Fortunately, I'm persistent, even obsessive. In a few months, I found critique partners who helped me separate the good from the bad. And that's where the real learning began.

Feb
9
2013

Reigning Rules -- by Petur HK

Language, or at least the corners of it that we can reach, rarely suffices, and it is a truth universally acknowledged that a writer in possession of something to say must be in want of just the right way to say it.

It's not like this is news to any of us, of course. But it still scares me shitless every time I sit down to write a new story, and usually I end up seeking refuge in silly openings such as Bigfoot trying to squeeze through a giant photograph, or a drunk teddy occupying Sartre's seat on a bench, or a group of actors pointing rubber chickens at a man. And I've come to accept that; I've even come to appreciate it. I'm a writerly coward, and I disguise it by being an artist.

On the rare occasions that I don't, however, when I'm feeling bold and boldly face the inadequacies of my vocabulary head on and challenge it to a fistfight ('cause, come on, honestly, that's how all of us like to picture it), I never forget the importance of considering anthropomorphism.

Feb
5
2013

My Publishing Story -- by Victorine E. Lieske

I'm thrilled to be able to introduce my book, Not What She Seems, and tell a bit about how it ended up on the NYT's best seller list.

I'm not really a writer. At least, not like some writers who were born to write. I'd always thought it would be cool to write a book, but never got around to it. Then one day I injured my back. It completely seized up and I literally could not move. I was on bed rest for a week, with nothing to do. I'd read all the novels in my house. I had no interest in sending my husband out to get me something from the library (I'm a picky reader). So I decided to write that novel I'd always wanted to write.

I stuck a pillow under my knees, fired up my laptop and started typing. One week later, I had a completed novel. I was silly enough to think the first draft was it. I was done! Luckily, when I was looking around online for how to get my perfect book printed, I found Critique Circle.

Feb
3
2013

Trimming the Fat -- by Tabitha

Years and years (and years) ago, the very first time I sat down to write a story, I couldn't wait to tell the reader everything. I love complicated plots, and I wanted to show my reader everything that my main character didn't know: events behind the scenes, the thought process of other characters and the bad guy(s), an overview of events happening in the present, how certain things worked, etc. Literally, everything that happened in the story, as well as a fair bit of research, was included. You can imagine the big mess I ended up with.

Jan
31
2013

Major changes to the Novel System -- by Jon Bjarnason

The novel system was first introduced to CC exactly five years ago, on January 14th 2007. To mark the occasion of the novel system's 5th anniversary we have just published the first major revision to this system since its inception.

For those of you who don't know that this is, every time you see a story on CC with a little blue book icon next to it, this is a part of a novel. This allows you to navigate between chapters at ease and allows the author to add all sorts of important and fun information to her chapters, making the pieces form a complete whole.

This system is available to premium members and has been a must-have for many people since it was first introduced. To date we have had over 1500 novels and a total of over 15000 novel submissions go through CC.

I wanted to do something a little special with the system to mark its 5 year mark, so instead of adding some simple features I decided to go back to the drawing board and re-architect the system from the ground up in order to add some of the features that people have been asking for, but I've been unable to implement so far because of the way the system was written at the start (before I had any idea how it would be used).

Jan
26
2013

Critique Groups: To Join Or Not To Join? -- by Missye Clarke

Writing is a lonely business. Every one in this industry can use a comrade-in-arms, a place to show their work to receive solid, constructive feedback on writing basics, grammar, and punctuation. Intermediate writers can join for story structure, character arc, sagging middles, metaphor, and form. As one advances, one can get into more nebulous aspects of the piece like theme, dramatic arc, style, voice, story and plot feedback, and overall consistency.
Once you're comfortable in where you are as a writer, and you like the group you?re with, find other avenues, be they online or face-to-face meetings, to socialize, grow and get to know one another. It also afford the writer to find an agent, editor, an organization or website to un-kink their project idea they couldn't find on their own, or churn a simmering plot idea with a simple question, conversation overheard, or even a smell to trigger a scent memory. You. Just. Never. Know.

Jan
22
2013

What Main Characters and Authors Have In Common -- by Tabitha

I've always been a plot-writer. When I get ideas, it's almost always in the form of some incident or object, and then the character appears later. As a result, they were never as fleshed out as they should have been. I used to read that way, too, not caring so much for the characters as long as something exciting was happening. But I've grown to appreciate a robust, realistic character in the past few years, and that has extended to my writing.

However (and that?s a BIG however), that doesn?t mean I had an epiphany and could suddenly write these amazing characters. It just means I knew I needed to write them, so I set out to figure out how. And I discovered that I was far better at writing minor characters than main characters. It seems completely backwards, and it?s taken a long time to figure out why that is. But I think I?ve finally clued in to something?

Jan
4
2013

The CC Digest -- by Jon Bjarnason

We have just launched a new service at Critique Circle called The CC Digest which I wanted to tell you guys a little about.

This is a personalized newsletter-style email that we send out to our members once a month which contains updates that might be interesting.

Examples of the type of information the email contains is unread messages and crits, novels you have been critting, the activity of people you have regular contact with, buddy events, news items, blogs, novel updates and much, much more.

Dec
26
2012

The year 2012 in numbers -- by Jon Bjarnason

Now that the year 2012 is drawing to a close it's a good time to take a step back and see how CC has been doing for the past year.

With that in mind I went on an expedition into our trusty ol' database and ran some queries and whatnot to dig up some stats.

Dec
19
2012

Scene and Sequel A Pantser's Worst Nightmare -- by Ashlyn Mathews

I?m what you call a Pantser, not a planner. When I write, I fly by the seat of my pants and let my characters take over. However, after having to do a ?wholesale rewrite? of my debut novel for my current publisher, Crimson Romance, I realized I needed structure.

Dec
10
2012

Writing alone, maybe. Living that way, maybe not. -- by Marcia Kuma

Since you're reading this blog, you've already found Critique Circle. I've been a member for three and a half years, and love it. But this post isn't about why CC is a great place for writers (though I do recommend it!)

In this age of improved technology, many writers naturally turn to the internet to find critique groups. The first time I showed my work-in-progress to anybody was in fact on CC but I've also been a member of a local, live writers' group for about a year and a half. That's where I get the sort of interaction you just can't manage online.

Dec
2
2012

Writing & Depression -- by Bogna Maslanka

I waited up until midnight on the first night and I ended up knocking out 2,271 words. For a first day that is fantastic. I should be incredibly proud of myself, but I'm not. I'm not angry at myself nor am I frustrated with my lack progress, I'm just meh. You read that right. I'm just meh about my writing (I asked several of my online writing buddies for a legitimate word for the feeling "meh" and they came up with "lethargic" and "indifferent"). It's a very odd feeling to have about a hobby that you love dearly.

Nov
25
2012

Got Juice? -- by Alex Sheridan

Has your story got juice? Does every sentence make us want to keep reading? If not, is there a vitamin you can take to cure the problem?
According to Stephen King, there is a vitamin that will cure the story blahs?it?s Vitamin V. King?s advice about using vigorous verbs is top-shelf stuff, and when applied, it can quickly up the muscle factor of any story.

Nov
19
2012

The Inhuman Protagonist -- by Ragtatter

The key to writing fascinating, engaging animal characters lies in learning everything you can about the species you?re writing for. Any story focused on an animal is already asking a lot of the reader?s willing suspension of disbelief, so don?t stretch that further by getting things wrong that you could just as easily get right. Know their biology, social behavior, natural habitats, etc. Become an expert on the animal, so that when you write you can slip into its point of view like a separate skin.

Nov
8
2012

The more you put in - the more you get out -- by Barbara Elsborg

When I came across CC ? it was mentioned on a writers' site I no longer frequent?it was like discovering the holy grail. At last there was a place where I could find out what unbiased people thought about my writing. As I began to critique people?s work and they began to critique mine, I discovered all sorts of things I'd never even thought about ? passive voice, mastering point of view, dialogue tags etc What I?d thought was pretty polished writing turned out to be anything but.

Oct
29
2012

The Importance of Sweating the Small Stuff -- by Candance Moore

When PGA expert Stephen Dundas was recently asked how amateur golfers can improve, he gave a rather blunt response:

Ask any professional and they will tell you that the most important part of the game is putting. This is where you can save many shots in a round. So why is it that very few golfers actually practice their putting? Probably because it's not as fun as smashing a driver or hitting the perfect iron shot, but putting is where you will be able to save more shots than any other part of your game.

Oct
23
2012

The Plot-Setting Connection -- by Anastasia (Nastia) Leach

All stories are anchored in place and time. As writers, we make them feel real through descriptions of era and locale, which come to life through objects, people, and their emotions. Description is critical to building a world, but it has its? own hazards. Put in too much detail about your characters and whoever is reading may put the story down. Too little detail will turn your characters into talking heads. How do we choose what to describe, and how to describe it? The advice I?ve found to be extremely useful is to stick to details that are relevant to the story. To me it means only using the details that move the plot along. Now, how do I figure out what those are?

Oct
15
2012

Are You a Good Hooker? -- by Alex Sheridan

A writer's learning curve is like the earth's horizon, it never ends, and that's a good thing. Finding ways to improve a novel's opening line, its 'hook', is something every author continuously works on.

Great authors make it look easy, but writers know better. Who knew, back when I was a virgin reader, that my favorite authors spent minutes, sometimes hours, thinking about the words and flow of a single sentence? Writing well requires a lot of 'moving parts'. No matter where you are on the journey.

Oct
9
2012

Why YA Authors Should Spend Less Time in Bookstores -- by Candance Moore

I have a confession: I don't read much YA fiction off the shelf.

My writing colleagues are surprised when I tell them that. They're convinced I've broken a cardinal rule of the business. I have to read the all new stuff every year, they say, or I won't know what agents are buying.

In most categories that's true ? but YA is a very different animal, and the usual rules have less relevance.

Sep
26
2012

Introducing The Great CC Glossary -- by Candance Moore

What the heck is the actual difference between voice and tone ? and where is there an answer that doesn't sound like grammar school gibberish?

Sep
7
2012

The Writer as a New Mom : A Survival Guide -- by Hulda Bjarnadóttir

You know how it is, you're plodding along, writing three pages one day, five the next, ten on a great day. You complete a story here and a novel there. Then all of a sudden a baby comes along. Whoa. Before you've even figured out what the hell you're supposed to be doing with this wonderful little human being who has taken over your entire life, you have another one. Next thing you know you're buried under an avalanche of diapers, glow-in-the-dark pacifiers, Playmobil figures and Moomintroll DVDs; you haven?t slept through the night since 2007 — and one day you realize you haven't written for, oh, four years...?

Aug
30
2012

Backing up your writing -- by Jon Bjarnason

You need to back up your writing! That is the most important advice I can give you (since I can't write actual prose to save my life). If you don't, you will regret it. Maybe not today. Maybe not tomorrow, but soon and for the rest of your life...

Aug
21
2012

Gearing Up For NaNoWriMo : Smart Goals -- by Hulda Bjarnadóttir

No need to check your calender, it is indeed August and not October 31st. There are still over two months to go until NaNoWriMo.
NaNo is crazy and chaotic, and that's what makes it work - for some of us. Many of us participate every year, but have never reached that magical final word count of 50.000.
A possible solution: Setting goals.

Aug
15
2012

Hot topic: Can I use lines from song lyrics or a poem in my book? -- by Critique Circle

In our hot topic series we'll be taking a close look at an interesting topic that has recently come up on our forums. Our first hot topic question: Can I use excerpts from song lyrics or a poem in my book?

Aug
14
2012

Food for Thought: Are Your Characters Overeating? -- by Rune Michaels

We all eat, and apparently, so do our characters. We may plough through a critique of a stubborn manuscript in progress and feel like eating is all these people ever do.

Aug
8
2012

Eleven Pillars of Character -- by Rune Michaels

Character is plot. Plot is character.

I believe it was F. Scott Fitzgerald who said this, although according to Google it has also been attributed to Henry James. Whoever said it, I have yet to meet a writer who disagrees.

Book ideas can start anywhere, from a basic idea, a ghost of a character, a plot twist or a theme that interests you. When thinking back on my four novels, two of them evolved from a plot idea and the other two from a character idea.

Aug
6
2012

Today's Story Starters -- Nature theme -- by Critique Circle

Moss grew on every stone.
It was that weird bird again. It had to be missing from a zoo or something.
The top of the mountain had never seemed so distant.
"Drop that coconut!" she shouted. "Step away slowly!"

Some things to consider: Season. Place. Time.

Aug
6
2012

August Hook Weekend over -- by Critique Circle

Well, the first Hook weekend of the year is behind us! We had 48 stories in the Hook Queue, and most of them received between 20 and 30 instances of feedback, ranging from 3 words (such as: "I liked it") to a few hundred.

Aug
5
2012

Beautiful libraries -- by Critique Circle

Check out this fantastic site: Beautiful Libraries. It has amazing images of all kinds of libraries.

Do you have a picture of your library you'd like to share?

Aug
4
2012

Today's Story Starters... Violence and death -- by Critique Circle

CC's Daily Story Starters - sometimes all you need is a little push in any direction...
Blocked? Bored? Blue? Need a push to start off today's writing?

Aug
3
2012

Sandbox writing -- by Critique Circle

It is a sad (but perhaps strangely reassuring?) fact: all writers have trouble getting to work and staying on track (there is the possible exception of Isaac Asimov who reportedly never wanted to do anything but write....).
There are some strange stories out there. John McPhee is said to have tied himself to a chair with the belt from his bathrobe. Victor Hugo had a servant take away his clothes and leave him alone in his office with no distractions from his pen and paper. Schiller liked to have rotten apples nearby as he worked — and we seem to recall some writer liked to stand in a tub of cold water to keep himself alert.

Aug
3
2012

The Hook returns! -- by Critique Circle

About a year ago there was a lot of excitement about the Hook queue, a unique queue for people to anonymously submit up to 1000 words of their manuscript, and receive very short and quick anonymous feedback. The idea is that readers read though the manuscript until they lose interest, much like an overworked editor trying to get through the slush pile mountain. Readers mark the spots where they quit, and preferably make some comments to the writer, reporting their thoughts on the manuscript and why they stopped reading where they did.

Aug
3
2012

Today's Story Starters... -- by Critique Circle

CC's Daily Story Starters - sometimes all you need is a little push in any direction...

Blocked? Bored? Blued? Need a push to start off today's writing?

Here are today's Story Starters. Use them as you see fit — alter them to suit your needs, use them as inspiration or as an exercise — or best of all, shake your head in disgust and write a much better line!



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